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Sensor technology could help paralyzed patients better control movement

Engineers at Brown University have developed an implantable brain sensor aimed to eventually help people with severe paralysis gain more control of their movement--a significant advancement for brain-machine interfaces.

Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling Promotes Recovery in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

Kennedy Krieger Institute's International Center for Spinal Cord Injury (Epub ahead of print) finds that long-term lower extremity functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling, as part of a rehabilitation regimen, is associated with substantial improvements in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury

Men With Fibromyalgia Often Go Undiagnosed

A new Mayo Clinic study suggests that many people who have fibromyalgia, especially men, are going undiagnosed.

New Exoskeleton Helps Paralyzed Patients Walk Again

The ReWalk Rehabilitation 2.0 system allows people with spinal cord injuries to walk again. The new device is an exoskeleton that mimics natural walking.

Adult Stroke Survivors Who Practice Tai Chi May Be At Reduced Risk For Falls

Tai Chi may reduce falls among adult stroke survivors, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013.

Restoring Voluntary Control Of Locomotion After Severe Spinal Cord Injury

In the lab, rats with severe spinal cord injury are learning to walk - and run - again. Rats in the lab are not only voluntarily initiating a walking gait, but they are sprinting, climbing up stairs, and avoiding obstacles after a couple of weeks of neurorehabilitation with a combination of a robotic harness and electricalchemical stimulation.

Cockroach-Inspired Robotics Could Aid In Gait Pathology And Stabilization Of Gait

Running cockroaches start to recover from being shoved sideways before their dawdling nervous system kicks in to tell their legs what to do, researchers have found.